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Most men with HIV know whether they have enough of the virus in their blood to make them contagious,

February 2020

Most men with HIV know whether they have enough of the virus in their blood to make them contagious, but new findings from Dr. Rob Stephenson et al. suggests 1 in 5 may mistakenly think they can’t spread the virus even when they can.
These findings from the Stronger Together study were recently featured in Reuters and NAM-AIDSMap.
The article, "Accuracy in self-report of viral suppression among HIV-positive men with HIV-negative male partner" will be published soon in the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (JAIDS).

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Featured Project

Featured Publication

Community report grab.PNG

Project Caboodle explores the acceptability and feasibility of self-collecting at home and returning by mail all, some, or none of the following five biological specimens: (i) finger-stick blood sample, (ii) pharyngeal swab, (iii) urine specimen, (iv) rectal swab, and (v) hair sample, among 100 high-risk, HIV-negative or unknown status US MSM (18-34 years, 50 black and 50 white) recruited through social networking websites and mobile gay dating apps.

A second phase of in-depth interviews from a sample of participants will collect qualitative data about participant's experiences in the study.

Click here to read the report

The Center for Sexuality and Health Disparities Team

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The Center for Sexuality and Health Disparities

University of Michigan School of Nursing 

400 North Ingalls St. 
Ann Arbor,MI, 48109-5482